Marshall McLuhan Lectures at Johns Hopkins University (mid ’70s)

12Apr12

 

Johns Hopkins University

Herbert Marshall McLuhan, CC (July 21, 1911 December 31, 1980) was a Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar — a professor of English literature, a literary critic, a rhetorician, and a communication theorist. McLuhan’s work is viewed as one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory.
McLuhan is known for the expressions “the medium is the message” and “global village”. McLuhan was a fixture in media discourse from the late 1960s to his death and he continues to be an influential and controversial figure. More than ten years after his death he was named the “patron saint” of Wired magazine.
Here he gives a lecture at John Hopkins University about language, media, and the brain. [no date is given -estimate mid ’70s]

Marshall McLuhan at John Hopkins University Part 1/5
06:05 to 08:30
“One of the peculiar effects of the alphabet was to separate the visual faculty from the other senses. Such an effect never occurred in china or Arab world. Only the Phonetic alphabet has the power to divorce the visual faculty from the other senses. Visual space is continuous and connected homogenous and static. All other spaces created by the other senses of touch, acoustics, kinaesthetic – all these other senses are discontinuous, resonant and dynamic, they are not static”
09:50 to end
“The alphabet in divorcing the heart (the right hemisphere of the brain) from the head (the left hemisphere of the brain” ……… (next video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHKx9tMuoD4&feature=related

Marshall McLuhan at John Hopkins University Part 2/5
00:00 to end
From previous video:
“The alphabet in divorcing the heart (the right hemisphereof the brain) from the head (the left hemisphere of the brain .. the quantifying visual detached observant function. The alphabet in doing that left the other side of the brain somewhat in abeyance. The Greeks developed an environment of services, roads, military. Alexander the Great would have been unthinkable without the alphabet and
without the lineality that went with it. And the Romans took over there and developed an even more
lineal and beurocratic hieratical structure. The Roman world created a world that pushed the right/left hemisphere into dominance. A dominance that remained throughout the middle ages, the renaissance and reaching peaks in the industrial assembly line and other structures of the kind.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29zX5bV9e6Y

Marshall McLuhan at John Hopkins University Part 3/5
06:30 to 08:30
Discontinuity is acoustic . Continuity and connectiveness is visual and left hemisphere. Discontinuity which is electric – electric current do not flow in the way water does through a pipe or a wire. That is not the form in which they exist. The Telegraph was not long in existence when we had a revolution in physics:

– Max Planck – 1900. Matter as discontinues quanta of energy. Matter was not connected at all. There was resonating intervals in matter (planck’s quantum theory)
– Freud – discontinuity between the unconscious and the conscious
– Picasso – discontinuous spaces called Cubism
– Einstein later – relativity theory refers to the fact that you have to measure anything in the world to the speed of light
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2ObzvixLkg

Marshall McLuhan at John Hopkins University Part 4/5
06:00 to 06:25
“You can have 20/20 vision in each eye and still be profoundly dyslexic. Dyslexia is not something that takes place in the eyes – it takes place in the matter of conversions of the eye in front of the page. Dyslexia is a problem of conversion” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVIupPkRF-k

Marshall McLuhan at John Hopkins University Part 5/5
00:35 to 01:00
“A recent report from Colorado reported that 99% of all men behind bars in Colorado are dyslexic cases”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eH97zTwiv-4

Advertisements


No Responses Yet to “Marshall McLuhan Lectures at Johns Hopkins University (mid ’70s)”

  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: