McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology Heritage Toronto Plaque Unveiling, October 12, 2016

19Oct16

For nearly fifty years, Heritage Toronto’s Plaques and Markers Program has officially remembered key people, places and events which have shaped the city we live in today. From 20th century skyscrapers, to the sites of former aboriginal villages, to the city’s first Chinatown, the range of possible plaque subjects has been as diverse as Toronto’s history itself. Current plaques can be viewed on the Heritage Toronto Exploration Map!

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Click on the image for an expanded view on all photos

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Assembled audience inside the Coach House for the Heritage Toronto McLuhan Centre Plaque unveiling, October 12, 2016 at 2 noon

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Dr. Seamus Ross, Interim McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology Director, opening remarks

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Tyler Greenleaf, Heritage Toronto

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Dr. Robert (“Bob”) Logan, Emeritus Professor & McLuhan collaborator

Immediately to his right, sitting down, is Gwendolyn McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan’s grand-daughter

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Kristyn Wong-Tam, City of Toronto Councilor

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Dr. Meric Gertler, President of the University of Toronto 

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David Mulroney, President of the University of St. Michael’s College

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Michael McLuhan, son of Marshall McLuhan & McLuhan Estate manager

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The plaque, to be affixed to the outside of the Coach House

A Short History of the McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology, informally known as the Coach House

1963-1994

On October 24, 1963, John Kelly, president of St. Michael’s College, and Claude T. Bissell, president of the University of Toronto, together decided to establish the Centre for Culture and Technology. The Centre became McLuhan’s office in the English Department at St. Michael’s College.

Beside McLuhan himself, the early members of the Centre included Allen Bernholtz (Architecture), Drs. Daniel Cappon and E. Llewellyn-Thomas (Medicine), B. M. Carpendale and Arthur Porter (Engineering), W. T. Easterbrook (Political Science), Carl Wilson (Psychology), Harley Parker (Design, Royal Ontario Museum) and Ed Rogers (Anthropology). Seminars, workshops, lectures and other events were held regularly wherever space was available.

While McLuhan was at Fordham University during 1967 and ’68, Professor Arthur Porter, the acting director of the Centre, obtained the Coach House for McLuhan’s Centre. Upon McLuhan’s return from New York, the Centre moved into its new home at 39A 39A Queen’s park Crescent East. Former and future students, visiting teachers and scholars, researchers, people with interesting ideas or proposals for joint work or just curious tourists stopped by the Program.

Through the 1970s, McLuhan’s famous Monday Night Seminars filled the main seminar room at the Centre. A dynamic community was formed during those seminars, a community remembered fondly by many participants who return to the Coach House today to visit and reminisce. The seminar room remains visually dominated by the stunning mural, Pied Pipers All, by Canadian artist René Cera, a gift to the McLuhan Program from McLuhan’s widow, Corinne McLuhan.

Following Marshall McLuhan’s death, on New Year’s Eve 1980, the University of Toronto closed the Centre, but following a tremendous worldwide outcry, the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology was reopened. Literacy scholar and OISE professor David Olsen became the first director.

In the summer of 1994, the McLuhan program joined the Faculty of Information Studies as a distinct research and teaching unit. From its base at the historic Coach House on the east campus, the McLuhan Program continued to engage in its explorations into the nature and effects of technologies on culture.

1994 – Present

In 1994, The McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology became a research and teaching unit of the University of Toronto Faculty of Information. The Faculty of Information is a professional graduate faculty of the University of Toronto and the home of a broad-based group of information professionals. FI offers two degree programs: a doctoral program (Ph.D.) and a Master of Information Studies program (M.I.St.) with three specializations: archival studies, information systems, and library and information science. Graduates work in a wide range of information settings as librarians, information systems specialists, web designers, educators, archivists, researchers, records managers, and information consultants. The iSchool also offers a (MMSt) Museum Studies Program.

In 2009, the iSchool, also known as the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto, launched the Coach House Institute (CHI) as a clearly defined research unit under which the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology now operates. The move recognizes the broad mandate of the CHI, facilitates its governance, management and oversight within governing UofT practices, and enables the CHI to make a significant contribution to the Faculty’s intellectual presence within the University.

On May 31, 2016 the Coach House Institute was officially renamed the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology. Source: https://goo.gl/44fdOk )

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One Response to “McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology Heritage Toronto Plaque Unveiling, October 12, 2016”

  1. 1 paologranata

    very nice!


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