Archive for the ‘DEW Line’ Category

Click on the image for an expanded view. Designed by Paolo Granata, University of Toronto Studying book history and print culture often requires a specialized terminology. Designed to honour the legacy of the German inventor Johannes Gutenberg, this 52-card deck is a guide to key terms, including illustrations and examples, used in printing history, bibliography, and textual scholarship. It’s also a […]


Photo courtesy of Eric McLuhan By Tim Belonax on the Design Envy website Is it possible to train the way that you think, the same way you might prepare for a sporting event or study for an exam? Is it possible to improve the way that you think or are we simply born into one […]


The Marshall McLuhan DEW-Line Newsletter was “an early warning system for the changing age we live in”. It was issued by media theorist, commentator and critic Marshall McLuhan [between 1968 and 1970], and included several loose-leaf facsimile papers on the nature of media, society and advertising, loose-leaf reproduced advertisements, and typographic experiments. DEW-Line is an acronym for […]


Marshall McLuhan wrote in his Introduction to the Second Edition of  Understanding Media: “The power of the arts to anticipate future social and technological developments, by a generation and more, has long been recognized. In this century Ezra Pound called the artist ‘the antennae of the race’. Art as radar acts as ‘an early alarm […]


 Patrick Watson & the Wooden Arms Published On Mon Nov 07 2011   –   Greg Quill, Entertainment Columnist A symbolic confluence of art, science and philosophy, the Dew Line Concert at Koerner Hall Thursday night — featuring Polaris prize-winning Montreal band Patrick Watson & the Wooden Arms and indie songwriter/guitarist Amy Millan of Stars — marks the […]


The following item was published online on the late Liss Jeffrey’s McLuhan Global Research Network, which was located at http://www.mcluhan.ca . That site is no longer online, but I have been able to retrieve this essay using the Internet Archive Wayback Machine. By Alex Kuskis, PhD A difficult to find item relating to McLuhan studies […]