Tuesday, 18 April, 2017 at 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

George Brown College, Waterfront Campus 

Learning Landscapes Auditorium, 51 Dockside Drive (Corus Quay E), Toronto, ON

In collaboration with Centre for Arts, Design & Information Technology at George Brown College and DigiFest.

Over the 2000s, Toronto initiated and instituted a process of cultivating itself as a creative city. This new focus gave Toronto the chance establish itself as a center for innovation, which strengthened urban cultural capital and helped promote the strategic agenda of becoming a competitor in the creative economy sector. Investment in research and creative city strategic planning, coupled with the allocation of financial and human capital resources across a variety of industries, served to encourage creativity, promote culture and competitiveness, and drive economic development. As a part of the McLuhan Salons series, this event will explore the cutting edge of Toronto as a Creative City. It will commence with moderated probative discussion within a panel of top leaders and thinkers, and will engage the audience. Operators in the field of creative industries, culture and arts are invited to join in.

Speakers: (Click on image for expanded view)

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller, Ohio State University, author of Planning for a City of Culture. Creative Urbanism in Toronto and New York;
Joe Mihevc, Toronto City Councillor Ward 21;
Luigi Ferrara, Centre for Arts & Design Dean and Director Institute without Boundaries, George Brown College;
Shawn Micallef, Columnist and writer, author of Frontier City: Toronto on the Verge of Greatness;
Geoffrey James, Toronto photo laureate, author of Toronto (with Mark Kingwell).

Moderator: Paolo Granata, McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology, University of Toronto

Click here to reserve seat: https://goo.gl/BXMtQ1

George Brown College, Waterfront Campus


The Great McLuhan- Frye Debate

An academic debate is an educational practicum requiring students to employ rhetoric, histrionic abilities and knowledge of the assigned topic to debate a given proposition or question with the goal of influencing the opinions of observers and/or the judge(s). 

This debate will answer the question: Who best – Marshall McLuhan or Northrop Frye – provides us with a strategy, or vision, for comprehending our present conditions?

The debate participants will be students in Professor B.W. Powe’s English 4004 class (Fall/Winter) at York University in north Toronto. The Fall term of the course focused on Marshall McLuhan with Northrop Frye covered in the spring term. The students have been divided into 2 teams representing Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye and have been meeting before the event to develop their case for each.

The selection of the winner (a tie is possible) will depend upon which side is the most persuasive. The judge will be Professor Paolo Granata of the University of Bologna and McLuhan Centenary Fellow at the McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology.

The Proceedings will unfold as each side presents the case for their visionary, starting with the McLuhan side (already decided by a coin toss), then the Frye side, followed by rebuttals from both. After a short break, each side will summarize what it presented and its position followed again by rebuttals from both sides. After another break, there will be a summary of each position, followed by the judge’s adjudication and declaration of the winner.

Professor Powe and his students have extended an invitation to interested parties to attend. Bring your lunch if you wish, as the event will start at noon.

Date & Time: Thursday, April 6th, 2017 – 12 pm until 3 pm

Location: McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology,

39A Queen’s Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C3

Course Description

This course examines and explores the point-counterpoint Canadian theoretical tradition of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye. This is a course devoted to exploring the perceptions and thoughts, the provocative and inspiring works, of these two seminal and influential thinkers. It is also a course that explores the influence of their work on other seminal writers and artists; and how literary works reflect and evoke their imaginative and prophetic propositions.

In the first term we will be concentrating on Marshall McLuhan. Our primary text will be The Book of Probes. We will be examining his most influential and well-known aphorisms, his tetrads, and the essential explorations he made into the media realm. In McLuhan’s final works he wrote—or dictated (most of his last books were collaborations, often conducted through conversation and discussion, with colleagues)—in aphorisms, elliptical epigrams, fragments, mixed modes, all what he chose to call probes.

McLuhan was searching for laws, or codes, that operated through the effects of the electronic media. He saw electronic media as a new text of nature—a second creation. His work in these stages took on poetic density and allusiveness. Can he be understood, then, as the first great poet-theorist of media? The so-called “media guru”, however, began as a literary person, studying the Renaissance trivium and quadrivium at Cambridge, under F.R. Leavis and I.A. Richards; and continued his literary studies as a professor of Symbolist Literature in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. His first published works were essays on James Joyce, G.K. Chesterton, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Wyndham Lewis. How did a thinker steeped in the traditions of western literature become the avatar of the electronic cosmos, and the patron saint of the magazine called Wired? His non-systematic approaches anticipate post-modern and contemporary discourse. He denied he had a theory, calling his work “ground…and percept”.

We will examine McLuhan’s terminology and articulations, in his attempt to frame an understanding of the new circumstances that electricity and its technologies—television, radio, computers—brought to people. We will focus on his last powerful utterances and their prophetic attempts to awaken media users.

The second term is devoted to examining the works of Northrop Frye. His studies and literary publications began in the work of William Blake, in the canon-changing book, Fearful Symmetry. In that work Frye begins to approach the concept that there could be a deep underlying structure to all of literature. We will explore how spiritual knowledge burst through to him, so he argued, in his final works, beginning especially with The Great Code. Frye sought unity behind chaos, and attempted to present to his readers “a new system” of thought and awareness through a radical revision of what we mean by text. Frye thought cosmos could be comprehended through the code buried inside the metaphors of certain great works, primarily The Bible. Thus we will be concentrating on The Great Code, with examinations of his more synoptic works, The Educated Imagination and his last major essay, The Double Vision. We will also be looking at fragments from his late Notebooks. In these works the literary critic and theorist—the author of Anatomy of Criticism—enlarged his vision to encompass theology. He became a visionary contrarian—highly controversial in his understanding of The Bible, and his presentation of “counter-history” and the nature of mythic consciousness.

We will examine their conflicting rhetorical strategies: McLuhan, the wily prankster and punster, the prophet of new media and the subliminal environments of electricity; Frye, the seemingly detached scholar, whose heretical thinking and sublime visionary intentions were often masked in a careful prose.
Both must be regarded as much more than critics; they were creators of new imaginative and perceptive methodologies.

Moreover, these two Canadians knew one another, and often debated the other through their writings, sometimes expressing vehement disagreements. What were these disagreements? What are their areas of harmony? Both began as academic literary critics and ended up becoming influential beyond academia. Both were fascinated by popular culture and by extra-literary expressions. Both were visionaries, seeking the pattern behind the patterns, who shrouded their errant quests, often erratic—one in the masks of satire, and the other in the nuanced arguments of theory. McLuhan and Frye have had their periods when they were highly valued, then their periods when they were dismissed or disavowed by literary establishments. Both were obsessed with the meaning of the word, “apocalypse”. What do their visions, their provocations, their observations, their pursuits of codes and laws have to say to us now?

Note: The course will be offered again in the next academic year on Fridays, 11:30 am until 2:30 pm.

“In the double vision of a spiritual and a physical world simultaneously present, every moment we have lived through we have also died out of into another order.”
– Frye, The Double Vision

Academic Disputation

McLuhan Interview with Pierre Babin, 1977:
“The electric world, which is acoustic, intuitive, holistic…invites [us] into total immersion, and it doesn’t lean towards goals or objectives but focuses only on a certain quality of life.
Babin: Could we call this a return to mysticism?
McLuhan: I think so. Gutenberg emphasized the process of outering and Marconi marked the start of its ebb.”
– The Medium and the Light


Neil Andersen and Carol Arcus of the [Toronto-based] Association for Media Literacy are proud to have been the guest editors of the Agency issue of The Journal of Media Literacy.

We chose Agency as the issue’s theme because there is ongoing debate over how users can exercise agency within environments comprised of big data, multinational media corporations and invisible pervasive surveillance.

We were very lucky to engage the cooperation of a range of international scholars  (see the Table of Contents below) who have shared their experiences and perceptions to produce a valuable exploration of Agency in the 21st century.

[Alex Kuskis note: This issue includes my essay on Marshall McLuhan on Agency in Education & Technology Use, pp. 50 – 56]

Click JMLVo.64No.1&2 2017 to download the issue.

Source: The Association for Media Literacy http://www.aml.ca/journal-media-literacy-agency/


 

“The true masterwork of Marshall McLuhan.” —Douglas Rushkoff

Marshall McLuhan was the visionary theorist best known for coining the phrase “The medium is the message.” His work prefigures and underlies the themes of writers and artists as disparate and essential as Andy Warhol, Nam June Paik, Neil Postman, Seth Godin, Barbara Kruger, and Douglas Rushkoff, among countless others.

Shortly before his death, together with his media scholar son Eric, McLuhan worked on a new literary/visual code–almost a cross between hieroglyphics and poetry–that he called “the tetrads.” This was the ultimate theoretical framework for analyzing any new medium, a koan-like poetics that transcends traditional means of discourse. Some of the tetrads were published, but only a few. Now Eric McLuhan has recovered all the “lost” tetrads that he and his father developed, and accompanies them here with accessible explanations of how they function.

270 pages • Paperback ISBN 978-1-682190-96-8 • E-book 978-1-682190-97-5

Reduced pre-shipment prices available at https://goo.gl/7bPRqe 

About the Authors

Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980) was an internationally-renowned media theorist and perhaps the first genuinely “modern” philosopher of communications. In the 1950s, he introduced the concept of the “global village,” a vast global “technological mind” that today would be called the Internet. Using humor and scholarship, he spoke of the interconnectedness of visual and written media—and nowhere do his theories achieve a more finished level than in the tetrads, as important visually as they are syntactically.

eric mcluhan author photo

Photo © Michael McLuhan
Besides co-writing Laws of Media in 1988 and working closely for many years with his father, Dr. Eric McLuhan has been deeply involved in exploring media ecology and communications. He is the author of more than a dozen books on media, perception, and literature. His website is at ericmcluhan.com .


Monday Night Seminar

Showcasing Undergrad ICCIT Student Work

LOCATION: McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology, 39A Queens Park Crescent                       East off 121 St. Joseph St., Toronto, ON M5S 2C3

Monday Night Seminar: Monday, March 27th, 6:00 – 8:00 PM 

Description

This Monday Night Seminar showcases the work of undergraduate ICCIT (Institute of Communication, Culture, Information & Technology) students taking a course (Technologies of Time and Space in Toronto) at the McLuhan Centre this semester with Professor Sarah Sharma (new Director of the McLuhan Centre). They began the course with seminal readings of McLuhan and other Toronto School theorists and have ended their semester thinking through the mediated politics of time and space in the city of Toronto! Join us on Monday, March 27th as they share their imaginative projects on the soundscapes at Yonge and Dundas Square, stampede in the Path, the gender politics of TTC ridership, gentrification at Moss Park, issues related to perspectival landscapes and vertical living, ride-sharing apps, and waste/information collection.

REGISTER NOW at https://goo.gl/NzvzFI

Read about ICCIT at University of Toronto at Mississauga here https://goo.gl/XqRIJD


In the age of Trump, McLuhan’s 50-year-old ideas seem prophetic. Here’s a primer. Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980) was a Canadian academic whose work on electronic media in the 60s has come to resonate in the digital age. This video is narrated by Alex Chow, one of the leaders of the 2014 Hong Kong Umbrella movement whose mass street occupation was mobilized and reported via social media.

An Animated Guide To Marshall McLuhan And “The Medium Is The Message”

By Katharine Schwab   –   March 16, 2017

The work of Canadian philosopher and writer Marshall McLuhan is just as relevant today as it was in the 1960s when McLuhan coined the phrase, “the medium is the message.” Now the animator Daniel Savage has created a simple, black-and-white animation for Al Jazeera that illuminates why this axiom resonates in 2017.

In his 1964 book Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, McLuhan wrote about how media affects daily life. But instead of focusing on the content–today, the tweets, Facebook posts, and news articles that many of us regularly consume–he was interested in how the form of the content, that platform that delivers it to you, can impact your psychology in insidious ways.

As the Hong Kong social activist Alex Chow narrates, Savage’s animation shows a figure reading a book inside of a square, which transforms into a figure listening to a radio inside of a circle, which morphs to a figure watching television inside another square, which, finally, changes into the figure typing into a computer inside of a triangle. The shifting geometric shapes act as a visual metaphor for how each progressive type of media affects the shape of the world in which people dwell, even if they don’t realize it. “The fact that our insane president can have a hissy fit and send it to the world with the tap of a screen really says something,” Savage tells It’s Nice That.

“McLuhan wasn’t saying that content is inconsequential,” Chow says in the animation. “He was saying that when we pay too much attention to it, we ignore the power of form in shaping our experience. So, if you don’t understand the medium, you don’t fully understand the message.”

“Another strange effect of this electric environment is the total absence of secrecy,” a recording of McLuhan narrates as pixels of light bombard the human figure in the animation. “With the end of secrecy goes the end of the monopolies of knowledge. Everything happens at once. There’s no continuity, there’s not connection, there’s no follow-through. It’s just all now.” That sure sounds like Twitter on a Wednesday. (Source: https://goo.gl/ckAPgT )

Critique of the Above Article & Video: But “the medium is the message is NOT just about elevating the importance of medium or “form” relative to content. It is about the transformative effect of the entirely new environment that is created by any new medium, the entire service industry that supports a medium, which could not continue to exist without it. The medium is just the figure in a much bigger environmental ground. McLuhan explains this best in a 1974 lecture titled “Living at the Speed of Light”, delivered at the University of South Florida:

“The car has lost its place in the heart of the people. That doesn’t mean it’s going to disappear overnight. Not at all. All it means is the effects of the car are disappearing. And privacy and service environment are part of the effects. When I say the medium is the message, I’m saying that the motor car is not a medium. The medium is the highway, the factories, and the oil companies. That is the medium. In other words, the medium of the car is the effects of the car. When you pull the effects away, the meaning of the car is gone. The car as an engineering object has nothing to do with these effects. The car is a figure in a ground of services. It’s when you change the ground that you change the car. The car does not operate as the medium, but rather as one of the major effects of the medium. So ‘the medium is the message’ is not a simple remark, and I’ve always hesitated to explain it. It really means a hidden environment of services created by an innovation. And the hidden environment of services is the thing that changes people. It is the environment that changes people, not the technology.” – McLuhan, M. (1974). ‘Living at the Speed of Light’, a lecture delivered at the University of South Florida, can be found in David Staines & Stephanie McLuhan (Eds.). Understanding Me: Lectures & Interviews (2003). Boston: MIT Press, 241-2.

Another criticism is that the video equates the word “medium” with the word “form” and they are not equivalent. The Google dictionary defines form as “the visible shape or configuration of something” and medium as “an agency or means of doing something”. These are two different things entirely.


Leonard Cohen (1934 – 2016)

This posting is obviously not about Marshall McLuhan, but I feel confident that the late great media visionary would approve. B.W. Powe, who was a student of McLuhan at the University of Toronto in the fall of 1978 in his last offering of his English 1000 graduate course, Media & Society, has written extensively about Marshall McLuhan in A Climate Charged: Essays on Canadian Writers (1984) (which also included an essay on Leonard Cohen), The Solitary Outlaw (1996) and in his magnum opus, Marshall McLuhan & Northrop Frye: Apocalypse & Alchemy (2014), based on his doctoral dissertation. And I sense McLuhan’s influence in other published writings, both fiction and poetry, by Bruce as well. Marshall McLuhan would have been aware of Leonard Cohen in the 1960s as a rising poet and fiction writer contributing to a nascent Canadian literature.

Bruce (B.W.) paid tribute to Leonard Cohen shortly before he died, along with Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith, in his talk otherwise dedicated to Bob Dylan, the recent Nobel Prize for Literature recipient, at last October’s Toronto School of Communication conference at the University of Toronto. I hope the readers of this blog will appreciate this poetic homage to the late Leonard Cohen, as I do. 

Eternal Granada

…is the world a poem
we’re all composing?

 

Leonard, you said Mystery lives Lorca lives
in New York City
in the way Magic is alive God is alive
in Montreal

But today on el Paseo de los Tristes
sightseers swear they saw uncanny figures,
kindred shades, one chanting
the other playing a flamenco guitar

their lyrics and strings striking light
in the white-stone place
the gypsies call
the area of morning

From B.W. Powe’s Andalusian poems, a work in progress

Source: https://goo.gl/s6kdCW


Saint Michael’s College Science Association, the Interconnectivity Studies Working Group and the University of St. Michael’s College will present a two-hour symposium on climate change and the Pope’s encyclical Laudato si’ (“Praise be to You”).

LOCATION: Alumni Hall 100, 121 St. Joseph Street

DATE: Thursday, April 6, 2017   ***   TIME: 4 PM to 6 PM

The focus of the symposium is a discussion and a dialogue among scientists and theologians of Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato si’ with its focus on global warming and climate change. In the encyclical, Pope Francis calls for such a dialogue. In Paragraph 13 and 14 of Laudato si’ he wrote:

Here I want to recognize, encourage and thank all those striving in countless ways to guarantee the protection of the home which we share. Particular appreciation is owed to those who tirelessly seek to resolve the tragic effects of environmental degradation on the lives of the world’s poorest. Young people demand change. They wonder how anyone can claim to be building a better future without thinking of the environmental crisis and the sufferings of the excluded. I urgently appeal, then, for a new dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet.”

Later in Paragraph 62 he wrote: “Science and religion, with their distinctive approaches to understanding reality, can enter into an intense dialogue fruitful for both.” The purpose of this symposium is to enter into the dialogue between science and religion that Pope Francis has called for.

To that end the following panel with scientists, theologians and scholars has been assembled.

Mary Hess is Professor of Educational Leadership at Luther Seminary in St. Paul Minnesota. She is currently the Patrick and Barbara Keenan Visiting Chair in Religious Education at USMC Faculty of Theology. She is past president of the Religious Education Association.

David Nostbakken is a McLuhan Fellow at the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology. His PhD was supervised by Marshall McLuhan. He is a co-founder of a number of initiatives in the field of ecology and religion including Vision TV, the Green Channel, the Ecology Global Network, Power of Peace Network (UNESCO sponsored) and WETV Network (on sustainable development).

Stephen Scharper is a professor in the Department of Anthropology and the School of the Environment. With graduate studies in theology and religion, one of the areas of his expertise is religion and ecology. He has also engaged in urban studies and the importance of water as a vital resource essential for life.

Kimberly Strong is a Professor in the Department of Physics and is the Director of the School of the Environment. She is a research scientist whose expertise is in atmospheric remote sounding using ground-based, balloon-borne, and satellite instruments for studies of ozone chemistry, climate, and air quality.

Ron Swail is the Chief Operations Officer, Property Services and Sustainability at the University of Toronto. Ron has initiated sustainability projects across the university and at the same time saved the university millions and millions of dollars.

Prof. Robert K. Logan is a Fellow of St. Michael’s College where teaches the McLuhan Seminar and the What is Information? Seminar. He is the Faculty Coordinator of the SMC Science Association. He is also the Chief Scientist of the sLab at OCAD University.

After the panel presentations and discussions among the panelists the student Interconnectivity Studies researchers from the Book and Media Studies program, Dalya Al-Bassam, Kate Gromova, Kalina Nedercheva and Olivia Penney will be introduced and they will read the abstracts of their research.

There will then follow a Q & A session with the audience.


By theLet’s help change Wikipedia gender-gap! Join us at the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology on Saturday, March 18, 2017 from 11 am to 5 p.m. for a communal updating of Wikipedia entries on subjects related to art and feminism.

Date/Time: Sat, March 18, 2017  –  11:00 am to 5:00 pm EDT

Location: McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology, 39A Queen’s Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C3

View Map

Description:

Free! Everyone welcome! No previous experience required!

Wikimedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the practical effect of this disparity, however, is not. Content is skewed by the lack of female participation. This represents an alarming absence in an increasingly important repository of shared knowledge.

Let’s change that. Join us at the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology on Saturday, March 18, 2017 from 11 am to 5 pm for a communal updating of Wikipedia entries on subjects related to art and feminism. Last year, over 1500 participants at more than 75 events around the world participated in the second annual Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, resulting in the creation of nearly 400 new pages and significant improvements to 500 articles on Wikipedia.

We will provide tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian and refreshments. Bring your laptop, power cord and ideas for entries that need updating or creation.

FAQs

What can I bring into the event? Bring your laptop!

How can I contact the organizer with any questions? info@blacklunchtable.com

PLEASE REGISTER HERE: https://goo.gl/TJeD23


 Marshall McLuhan

Teachers are always thrilled when a student of theirs gets a work they’ve written published, and even more so when that work was created in the first place for a school assignment. That was the case for Dr. Roxanne O’Connell, Professor of Communication, Visual and New Media at Roger Williams University in Bristol, Rhode Island. Her student Hannah Strait submitted a poem titled If McLuhan Were Here Today for an assignment in her media studies course called McLuhan’s Global Village. It was submitted in a significantly longer version than the extract below, which was the one that was published. I’m sure that Marshall McLuhan, poetry lover himself, would have enjoyed receiving poetry as an assignment submission, rather than just another academic paper. Congratulations, Hannah!

If McLuhan Were Here Today

by Hannah H. Strait

A heightened form of visual outlook,

Awakened to unrecorded conduct.

Conquering experience like a crook,

Rendering experience picked and plucked.

***

Showing people, instead of being us:

Pure perception is gained by life process.

The constant perpetual sharing is a fuss.

We must do for our internal progress.

***

The end of that tale can be quite woeful.

Mass consumed, mass produced, and we abuse.

The mind becomes numb, and life is dull,

No one stops to smell the flowers like ewes.

***

Our ego’s impulse is to stop caring,

What happens around us does not matter.

Now holding in our thoughts is daring,

And private sacred moments shatter.

***

What sort of hypocrisy happens here?

When GoPro petitions we are ‘hero’s’:

War joins the utile tool to drones building fear,

Loathsome, hideous deaths then tools bestow.

***

We must stop prostituting precious life.

Immerse yourself in the nature of things,

End your misery, your destruction, and strife.

Discover, and explore the beauty that brings.

Publication Details

Book Title: Upon Arrival: Commencement
Publisher: Eber & Wein Publishing
Year of Publication: 2016
Page: 169
 
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